14642 Newport Ave. Ste 450       Tustin, CA 92780  (714) 709-4944

4100 Central Ave. Ste 101  Riverside, CA 92506  (951) 642-1059

EXPERIENCE

DEDICATION

COMPASSION

We like to know what our patients our thinking to help with continued quality control. After your first visit, you will be sent a survey so that you may help us continue to strive to reach excellence in patient care.

 

 

Patient Satisfaction Survey- Your Opinion Counts

 

 

"I have dealth with Edith each time and she has been friendly, informative, and professional."

 

 

"Dr. Mehtani was very thorough when explaining my condition and the procedure she needed to perform." -TOD

 

 

"I'm very happy with Dr. Kanda, top caliber in treatment and character." DM

 

 

"I feel very secure wiwth Dr. Kanda." MLR

 

 

"I like the fact that Dr. Mehtani gives you choices in treatment and medications and is truthful about results."- RT

 

 

"Staff has always been very friendly and helpful- from my first visit 2 years ago."- RT

 

 

"Very complete, professional and gentle."- HT

 

 

 

Would you like to give us your thoughts? Please feel free to email us at [email protected]

 

 

The posterior tibial tendon starts in the calf, stretches down behind the inside of the ankle, and attaches to bones in the middle of the foot. This tendon helps hold the arch up and provides support when stepping off on your toes when walking. If it becomes inflamed, over-stretched or torn, it can cause pain from the inner ankle. Over time, it can lead to losses in the inner arch on the bottom of your foot and result in adult-acquired flatfoot.

Signs and symptoms of posterior tibial tendon dysfunction include:

  • Gradually developing pain on the outer side of the ankle or foot.
  • Loss of the arch and the development of a flatfoot.
  • Pain and swelling on the inside of the ankle.
  • Tenderness over the midfoot, especially when under stress during activity.
  • Weakness and an inability to stand on the toes.

People who are diabetic, overweight, or hypertensive are particularly at risk. X-rays, ultrasound, or MRI may be used to diagnose this condition.

Left untreated, posterior tibial tendon dysfunction may lead to flatfoot and arthritis in the hindfoot. Pain can increase and spread to the outer side of the ankle.

Treatment includes rest, over-the-counter nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and immobilization of the foot for six to eight weeks with a rigid below-knee cast or boot to prevent overuse. Note: Please consult your physician before taking any medications.