14642 Newport Ave. Ste 450       Tustin, CA 92780  (714) 709-4944

4100 Central Ave. Ste 101  Riverside, CA 92506  (951) 642-1059

EXPERIENCE

DEDICATION

COMPASSION

We like to know what our patients our thinking to help with continued quality control. After your first visit, you will be sent a survey so that you may help us continue to strive to reach excellence in patient care.

 

 

Patient Satisfaction Survey- Your Opinion Counts

 

 

"I have dealth with Edith each time and she has been friendly, informative, and professional."

 

 

"Dr. Mehtani was very thorough when explaining my condition and the procedure she needed to perform." -TOD

 

 

"I'm very happy with Dr. Kanda, top caliber in treatment and character." DM

 

 

"I feel very secure wiwth Dr. Kanda." MLR

 

 

"I like the fact that Dr. Mehtani gives you choices in treatment and medications and is truthful about results."- RT

 

 

"Staff has always been very friendly and helpful- from my first visit 2 years ago."- RT

 

 

"Very complete, professional and gentle."- HT

 

 

 

Would you like to give us your thoughts? Please feel free to email us at [email protected]

 

 

Peroneal tendons are two tendons that support two important foot muscles (peroneus brevis and peroneus longus) that originate on the outside of the calves. These two muscles allow you to roll to the outside of the foot while standing.

Peroneal tendons are also called stirrup tendons because they help hold up the arch of the foot. The two muscles are held in place by a band of tissue, called the peroneal retinaculum. Injury to the retinaculum can cause this tissue to stretch or tear. When this happens, the peroneal tendons can dislocate from their groove on the back of the fibula. The tendons can be seen to roll over the outside of the fibula, which damages the tendons.

Skiing, football, basketball, and soccer are the most common sports activities leading to peroneal tendon dislocation. In some cases, ankle sprains have also caused this condition. Patients usually have to use crutches after such an injury, in order to allow the retinaculum tissue to heal and the tendons to move back to their natural position on the fibula. Sometimes a splint or compression bandage is applied to decrease swelling. Anti-inflammatory medications and ice are often part of the treatment. Note: Please consult your physician before taking any medications.

In moderate to severe cases of injury, when the peroneal retinaculum is torn or severely stretched and susceptible to dislocation, surgery may be required.